Tag Archives: Two Spirit

Warren

Warren is a two spirit gay man from Iskatewi-zaaga’iganiing Nation at the Manitoba/Ontario border. He is among the last in his nation to grow up speaking the language and learning traditional ways. At the time of this video he was working with the Ontario Aboriginal HIV/AIDS Strategy. Warren is now an independent consultant, advocate and educator around human rights issues, Two Spirt culture and Aboriginal culture.

Warren’s story is one in a series recorded at World Pride in Toronto, Ontario in 2014. Heart felt thanks go to the sponsors of this series: Media Net in Victoria, BC, Trinity Square Video in Toronto and The Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, Lynch History Grant. Special thanks to Milada Kovacova at Trinity.

Jack

Jack talks about his experience as a young trans person and how that inspired his advocacy work today. Jack is currently the President of the Student’s Union at the University of Saskatchewan, he is also the Saskatchewan Rep for the Mental Health Commission of Youth Council, the Saskatchewan Rep and Vice Chair for the National Indigenous Youth Council on HIV and AIDS, and sits on the Aboriginal Peoples Patient & Family Advisory Council in the Saskatoon Health Region.

Jack’s story is one in a series recorded in conjunction with Out Saskatoon, in 2014. Heart felt thanks goes to the sponsors of this series: media-net.bc.ca in Victoria, BC and www.outsaskatoon.ca in Saskatoon, SK. Special thanks to Liz Senecal at Out Saskatoon.

Richard

Richard is a Cree, Metis with full status. Over his life Richard has struggled with a number of issues; bigotry, racism, and the lack of recognition of Two Spirit People within his culture just to name a few. Richard talks about his response to this discrimination, and his role in a cultural knowledge transfer process, focusing on the cultural history of Two Spirit People.

Richard’s story is Story Number 100 in the Queer Story Archive.
Who would have thought onmyplanet.ca would see Story Number 100?
But here we are. I’m so proud.

We keep putting together the bits of Queer her/his/hirstory and all those bits keep teaching us all a little bit more about our communities.

On this auspicious occasion, I would like to take a moment to say thank you to all of you who have shared your story – to those who have told your stories and are still waiting for them to be posted, and to those who are waiting patiently to share your stories in the future – Onmyplanet.ca is nothing without you.

Thank you also to all of you for continuing to watch the stories and for continuing to support the site through your donations and by being members of onmyplanet.ca.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank The Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies at The University of Toronto for honouring The Queer Story Archive at onmyplanet.ca with The Lynch History Grant this year. We are forever grateful and with this grant we will continue to post the stories collected in Toronto over World Pride in June of 2014.

A big thank you also goes out to our unfaltering sponsor, Media Net in Victoria, BC, for providing equipment and support in an ongoing way since onmyplanet.ca began in 2011.

Special Thanks goes out to all the sponsors and groups that have helped us in countless ways with donations, travel expenses, accommodations, a space to record in, snacks and refreshments for the video afternoons, helping us find storytellers, by inviting us to their conferences, and by supporting and promoting the project to their local communities:
Victoria Lesbian Senior Care Society, UVic Pride, The Transgender Archive at University of Victoria, in Victoria BC, Yukon Queer Film Alliance, in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Qmunity, Vancouver, BC Trinity Square Video, in Toronto, Ontario, Paved Arts, and The Avenue Community Centre in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

Here’s to the next 100 stories!!

xo
Lulu

Blodge

Since the recording of this story, Blodge (yes it’s a nic name) has transitioned and is now Chase, a “testosterone-based” individual. In this story, recorded in 2013, he tells an entertaining tale about his experience with gender expressions and stereotypes both in the town where he grew up in southern Ontario and in communities in the Yukon Territory. An updated story was recorded at the Moving Trans History Forward conference in 2016, and once it is available will be linked here.

Blodge’s story video is the first of a series of videos from Whitehorse, YT that were facilitated by the Yukon Queer Film Alliance with the generous support of Arts Fund Yukon. YQFA is responsible for OUT North, the first queer film festival north of 60. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Yukon-Queer-Film-Alliance/369436306474933?fref=ts